Wednesday, January 13, 2021

A Partial Eclipse

A Partial Eclipse

with a  grapefruit (Citrus × paradisi) and
a pomelo (Citrus maximus) on snow in my yard
at Shapleigh, Maine on January 7, 2021,
painted January 8, 2021
10" x 8" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $300

Tuesday, January 12, 2021

Pomelo in Snow Space

Pomelo in Snow Space

a pomelo (Citrus maximus) on snow
in my yard at Shapleigh, Maine on January 7, 2021,
painted January 8, 2021
7" x 5" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $150

Grapefruit in Art

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Grapefruit in Art
by Noted Artists
Harry Brodsky, Paul Gauguin,
Doris Lee, Roy Lichtenstein, Man Ray,
Susan Jane Walp, Marie-Louise Von Motesiczky,
and Marguerite Thompson Zorach
(a gender balanced group)

1
Stilleben mit Schafen / Still Life with Sheep
Marie-Louise Von Motesiczky (1906-1996), Austrian
Oil paint on canvas, 32" x 16" (w x h), 1938
Tate Museum, London, UK


Wiki:

Of her life in art, Marie-Louise once remarked, "If you could only paint a single good picture in your lifetime, your life would be worthwhile."

Tate Museum Note:
This was painted in a small hotel in Amsterdam. The artist had traveled there with her mother from their home in Vienna, immediately following the arrival of the Germans in Austria in 1938. In this still life, she posed the objects, including two eighteenth-century Chinese sheep ornaments and some fruit, on an ironing board in the hotel, with the ironing board dictating the unusual oblong shape of the painting. Aside from the sheep, objects whose reassuring familiarity reminded the artist of her Viennese surroundings, this unusual still life is characterized by the rich colors of the grapefruit and by the bunch of grapes.

Read the moving and uplifting notes about her and flight from the Nazis HERE in the "Catalogue Entry" and on Wiki HERE.

Also, Susan Abbott of Vermont, who I took two workshops years ago with, has a posting, Great Art, Lousy Times, that you might find of interest HERE.

2
Five Grapefruits
Man Ray (1890-1976), American
Oil on canvas, 20" x 12" (w x h), 1948
Christie's auction 2019 sold $275,000 USD


Wiki edited:
Man Ray's birth name was Emmanuel Radnitzky. He was born in South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in1890. He was the eldest child of Russian Jewish immigrants Melach "Max" Radnitzky, a tailor, and Manya "Minnie" Radnitzky (nee Lourie or Luria). He had a brother, Sam, and two sisters, Dorothy "Dora" and Essie (or Elsie), the youngest born in 1897, shortly after they settled in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. In early 1912, the Radnitzky family changed their surname to Ray. Man Ray's brother chose the surname in reaction to the ethnic discrimination and antisemitism prevalent at the time. Emmanuel, who was called "Manny" as a nickname, changed his first name to Man and gradually began to use Man Ray as his name.

After living in Paris since 1921, Man Ray was forced to return to the United States due to the Second World War. He lived in Los Angeles from 1940 to 1951 where he focused his creative energy on painting. A few days after arriving in Los Angeles, Man Ray met Juliet Browner, a first-generation American of Romanian-Jewish lineage. She was a trained dancer, who studied dance with Martha Graham, and an experienced artists' model. The two married in 1946 in a double wedding with their friends Max Ernst and Dorothea Tanning. In 1948, the Year he painted Five Grapefruits, Man Ray had a solo exhibition at the Copley Galleries in Beverly Hills, which brought together a wide array of work. In 2013 his 1916 canvas Promenade sold for $5,877,000 at the Sotheby's New York Impressionist and Modern Art Sale.

3
Apples, Grapes, Grapefruit
Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997), American
Oil and Magna on canvas, 54" x 40" (w x h), 1974
Christie's UK auction 2015 sold $2,851,150 USD (2,098,500 GBP)

Christie's notes edited:
By the time Apples, Grapes, Grapefruit was painted, Lichtenstein had firmly established himself as one of the leading figures of the Pop Art movement. With its bold palette, impeccable geometries and finely-calibrated composition, Roy Lichtenstein's Apples, Grapes, Grapefruit stems from the important series of still life paintings that the artist produced between 1972 and 1974. His still life paintings departed from the distinctive cartoon imagery that had brought about his rise to fame during the 1960s. Acquired by Lord and Lady Jacobs directly after its creation, it was held in their collection until this auction.

Lichtenstein's still life objects are reduced to a set of basic circular geometries, the components of Apples, Grapes, Grapefruit, signified purely through shape and color. The reductive, highly stylized appearance was the result of his labor-intensive method. The composition began life as a small-scale drawing, reworked several times before it was projected onto canvas. Here, a second stage of drawing and redrafting took place, always deferring to the original sketch, with colored paper taped into place for reference. It was through this method that stripes replaced his Ben Day dots. They were incorporated into finished canvases from 1969 onward. Ben Day himself had often used lines in his shading system, and Lichtenstein reveled in their disorientating optical quality, claiming that the stripes had the power to alter our perception of color.

4
Grapefruit Still Life
Doris Lee (1904–1983), American
Oil on canvas board, 20" x 16" (w x h), 1950
Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Greensburg, Pennsylvania

Simple Pleasures publisher's book info edited:
Lee was one of the most recognized artists in America during the 1930s and 40s. She was a leading figure in the Woodstock Artist's Colony. Her art reveals an ability to merge the reduction of abstraction with the appeal of the everyday. In so doing, she offers a coherent visual identity that successfully bridges the various artistic camps that formed with the shift in the art world in the post-World War II era.

In 1935 her painting Thanksgiving was awarded the Art Institute of Chicago's Logan Prize and instigated the Sanity in Art movement in protest. Two years later, her painting Catastrophe was purchased by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Lee's commercial commissions for patrons such as American Tobacco Company, Life magazine, Abbott Laboratories, and Associated American Artists are compelling in both their populist accessibility and in their deceptively sophisticated abstraction.
Simple Pleasures presents Simple Pleasures: The Art of Doris Lee, September 2020, the first major assessment of works by Doris Lee is on amazon HERE. Her art from this book on exhibit at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Greensburg, Pennsylvania, September 26, 2021 - January 09, 2022 HERE.

5
Grapefruit with Black Ribbon
Susan Jane Walp (1948- ), American
Oil on linen, 8" x 8" (w x h), 2000
Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College

Antrese Wood note:
Susan Jane Walp paints still lifes from her home in Vermont. Her compositions expertly balance silent spaces with a powerful geometry that pulls you in and holds you. Her influences range from Piero de la Francesca to Lennart Anderson whom she met and studied with at a summer program run by Boston University during her undergrad years.

Susan Jane Walp:
"In the late 1960s ... to make up credits ... I went to a program at Tanglewood, (Massachusetts) run by Boston University. Miraculously, Lennart Anderson was teaching there. The students from BU were very serious, and only because the beginner class was full, I was placed in Lennart's advanced class. That summer completely changed everything. I saw that my life was going to be devoted to becoming a painter.

Lennart painted in class; he didn't talk much. But I understood that he was teaching an approach to seeing tonal relationships. It was a very sensual, felt response to the motif. It was about discovering the beauty of these relationships and the thrill of translating them into paint. At the time, he was recommending a Dover book by Charles Hawthorne, Hawthorne on Painting, 1960 (on amazon HERE), which we all read and reread."

Born in Allentown, Pennsylvania, she received her BA from Mount Holyoke College, followed by studies at the New York Studio School and Brooklyn College. The artist's website is HERE.

6
Grapefruit
Marguerite Thompson Zorach (1887-1968), American
Lithograph, 11" x 16" (w x h), circa 1927
Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York
Gift of the collection of the Zorach children
Two sketches for this are at the Smithsonian
American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Bruce note:
If this is a self-portrait with her daughter, and this would be when her daughter was that age, 10-years old, it's of Marguerite and her daughter, Dahlov. I had the good fortune to cross paths with Dahlov Zorach Ipcar as authors. Dahlov was a fine artist and illustrated thirty children's books. The first time we met was in an elevator at a children's book conference at the University in Gorham, Maine. The last time we met was in Boothbay Harbor, where she signed a copy of The Little Fisherman, by Margaret Wise Brown (Goodnight Moon), and illustrated by her. It was a gift going to Iceland for the boy who was the star in my book set in Iceland, Going Fishing.

Wiki notes edited:
Marguerite Thompson Zorach was one of a small group of women admitted to Stanford University in 1908. Rather than completing her degree, she traveled to France at the invitation of her aunt, Harriet Adelaide Harris. Marguerite visited the Salon d'Automne the very day that she arrived in Paris. It was the intention of her aunt that Thompson attend the École des Beaux-Arts, but Marguerite was turned away as she had never drawn a nude from life. Marguerite had no interest in the formulas of academic painting. She chose to attend the post-impressionist school Académie de La Palette, where she was encouraged her to pursue her own interests, to paint in a style that was uniquely her own. She exhibited at the 1910 Société des Artistes Indépendants, and the 1911 Salon d'Automne, both renowned for their modernist themes.

While in Paris, she socialized with Pablo Picasso, ex-patriot Gertrude Stein, Henri Rousseau, and Henri Matisse through her Aunt Addie's connections. At school, the Académie de La Palette, she first met her future husband and artistic collaborator, William Zorach. William admired her passionate individuality, and he said of her modernist Fauvist artwork "I just couldn't understand why such a nice girl would paint such wild pictures."

Back in California in 1912 she gave birth to a son, Tessim Zorach, in 1915, and a daughter, Dahlov Zorach, in 1917, eventually, settling in Greenwich Village. In 1922 they visited Gaston Lachaise at Georgetown, Maine, and later bought a house.

7
Still Life with Grapefruit
Harry Brodsky (1908-1997), American
Lithograph, 7 of 15
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Terra Foundation edited:
Harry Brodsky, a painter, print maker, designer, and teacher, is best known for lithograph images of Philadelphia and the surrounding area made in the 1930s and 1940s. Brodsky made both color and monochrome lithographs of a variety of themes and in a wide range of styles reflecting current trends in American art in the middle decades of the twentieth century. Still lifes, landscapes, city scenes, and interiors showing ordinary Philadelphians comprise his subjects; he also created purely nonobjective compositions. A native of Newark, New Jersey, Brodsky graduated from the Philadelphia College of Art and also attended the University of Pennsylvania.

8
Nature morte aux pamplemousses /
Still Life with Grapefruits
Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), French
Oil on canvas, 30" x 26" (w x h), circa 1901-1902
Basil & Elise Goulandris Foundation, Athens, Greece

Foundation Notes edited:
It's believed that Gauguin painted Still Life with Grapefruits, which for many years was entitled Still life with Apples and Flowers, in 1901. Experts came to this conclusion based on the arrangement of objects on the leather trunk, bringing the composition close to other paintings in the same year, and on his confinement to the hospital and subsequently to his studio due to illness, when he had to paint without a model.

His main concern appears not just the arrangement of the objects but the layout of the colors and the creation of harmony. The classic elements of Western still life have been replaced by exotic flowers, peppers and grapefruits.

Monday, January 11, 2021

Pear on a Beech

Pear on a Beech

a D'Anjou pear (Pyrus communis) on
an American Beech tree (Fagus grandifolia)
with a sheet metal screw to hold it on this tree
by my house in Shapleigh, Maine on December 29, 2020,
painted January 8, 2021
10" x 8" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $300

The Art of the Pear

The Art of the Pear
by Noted Artists
Paul Cézanne, Stuart Davis, Charles Demuth,
Gerald Murphy, Man Ray, William Scott,
Vincent van Gogh, and Andy Warhol


1
Untitled (Pear)
Stuart Davis (1892-1964), American
Watercolor and pencil on paper,
12" x 42" (w x h), circa 1921

Wiki edited:
Stuart Davis was an early American modernist painter. In the 1920s he developed his mature style, painting abstract still lifes and landscapes. His use of contemporary subject matter such as cigarette packages and spark plug advertisements suggested a proto-pop art element to his work. He painted series, works with similar structures, but with altered colors or added geometric embellishments, essentially creating variations on a theme. Some commentators suggest that this aspect of his work parallels his love of jazz in which a basic chord structure is improvised upon by the musicians.

He was well known for his jazz-influenced pre-popart paintings of the 1940s and 1950s, bold, brash, and colorful, as well as his Ashcan School pictures in the early years of the 20th century. With the belief that his work could influence the sociopolitical environment of America, Davis' political message was apparent in all of his pieces from the most abstract to the clearest.

2
Poire d'Erik Satie / Pear from Erik Satie
Man Ray (1890-1976), American
Color lithograph on paper, 12" x 18" (w x h),
edition number 116 of 120, 1969
Christies 2016 UK auction sold 4,000 USD (3,000 GBP)

Wiki edited:
Erik Satie (1866-1925) was a French composer and pianist. Satie, and eccentric, was an influential artist in the late 1800s to early 1900s Parisian avant-garde. His work was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music, and the Theatre of the Absurd.

American Man Ray met the French native Erik Satie in 1921, shortly after the Man Ray arrived in Paris. The French composer was more than 20 years older than Man Ray. Despite Satie's crippling shyness and eccentricities, he was a key figure in French society. He was renowned not only for his musical works, but also for his writing and art pranks. He met with Man Ray in December 1921 on the eve of Man Ray's first French solo exhibition. The pair retired to a café for hours.

Man Ray, born Emmanuel Radnitzky, was an American visual artist who spent most of his career in Paris. He was a significant contributor to the Dada and Surrealist movements, although his ties to each were informal. He produced major works in a variety of media but considered himself a painter. He was best known for his photography, a renowned fashion and portrait photographer. Man Ray is also noted for his work with photograms, which he called "rayographs" in reference to himself.

3
Two Green Pears
William Scott (1913-1989), British
Lithograph, 51/75, 11" x 9" (w x h), 1974
Provenance: Estate of Annette McGuire Cravens, Buffalo, NY
Cotton Auctions, Geneseo, NY 2017 auction, sold $3,776


Chloë Ashby, on ArtUK, (full article HERE)
Scott's heyday was in the 1950s. His exhibition at London's Hanover Gallery in 1953 was seen by directors at the Guggenheim and MoMA, who went on to sing his praises in the US. In 1958, he was the UK's chief representative at the Venice Biennale. In 1961, David Sylvester said that he had gained 'the soundest, all-roundest international reputation of any living British painter, Nicholson apart', and in 1973 Hilton Kramer called him 'the best painter of his generation in England'. But with the arrival of Pop Art, he fell from favour – until the 2000s, when twentieth-century British art began to gain in popularity.

And what a relief, because there's so much pleasure to be gained from looking at Scott's art, spartan as it is. He took the ordinary and made it extraordinary. Like any good designer, he understood the power of well-placed white space. It's there, as in a well-timed pause, that we have time and space to feel. And feel you will. Because empty as Scott's paintings may seem, each is invested with emotion. That, and a lingering human presence, in a snuffed candle, a simmering pan, a sliced lemon.

Note:
He was born at Greenock, Scotland, of Irish and Scottish parents and was brought up in Ulster. He studied at Belfast College of Art, 1928-31, and the Royal Academy, 1931-5. Known for still-life and abstract painting, William Scott is the most internationally celebrated of 20th-century Ulster painters.

4
Space Fruit: Still Life
Andy Warhol (1928-1987), American
Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board,
40" x 30" (w x h), edition 18 of 30, 1979

Andy Warhol's Space Fruit: Still Lifes, the complete set of six screenprints in colors, edition XVIII / XXX, 18 / 30, sold at Christie's New York Auction, 2012, for $92,500 USD, sold to benefit the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

5
Wasp and Pear
Gerald Murphy (1888-1964), American
Oil on canvas, 39" x 37" (w x h), 1929
MoMA, Museum of American Art, New York


MoMA gallery note:
"If that's painting, that's what I want to do," Murphy remarked in 1922, upon discovering paintings by Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Georges Braque, and Juan Gris in a Paris gallery. Soon after, he ended his career as a landscape architect and turned to painting. In Wasp and Pear, he combined anatomically detailed and highly stylized depictions of his subjects—a wasp, pear, leaf, and honeycomb—with an abstract background of overlapping planes of color. As his inspiration, Murphy credited the "technically drawn and colored charts of fruits, vegetables . . . [and] insects" found in a classroom in which he studied during his military training.

Wiki edited:
Gerald only painted from 1921 until 1929. He's known for his hard-edged still life paintings in a Precisionist, Cubist style. During the 1920s Gerald Murphy, along with other American modernist painters in Europe, notably Charles Demuth and Stuart Davis, created paintings prefiguring the pop art movement. Gerald and his wife Sara were wealthy, expatriate Americans who'd moved to the French Riviera in the early 20th century and who, with their generous hospitality and flair for parties, created a vibrant social circle, particularly in the 1920s, that included a great number of noted artists and writers. Pablo Picasso, a friend of Sara, painted her in several of his 1923 works.

6
Green Pears
Charles Demuth (1883-1935), American
Watercolor over graphite, 20" x 14" (w x h), 1929
Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut


"Search the history of American art," wrote Ken Johnson in The New York Times, "and you will discover few watercolors more beautiful than those of Charles Demuth. Combining exacting botanical observation and loosely Cubist abstraction, his watercolors of flowers, fruit and vegetables have a magical liveliness and an almost shocking sensuousness."

7
Two Pears / Deux poires
Paul Cézanne (1839-1906), French
Oil on canvas, 9" x 7" (w x h), circa 1875
Christie's 2015 auction sold $1,565,000 USD
Private Collection


Christie's Auction notes edited:
This was painted in a difficult period in Cézanne's personal life, as he shuttled between his family's estate at Aix and the apartment in Paris where he had installed his mistress, Hortense, and their young son, Paul, whose existence he hid from his authoritarian father. The deliberate and meditative work of still-life painting seems to have offered the artist a respite, as he strove to transform Impressionism into "something solid and durable like the art of the museums."

"He produced a few canvases representing only isolated fruit," Henri Loyrette wrote. "These can be viewed as studies in which the artist examined his subject from every angle, thoroughly perusing their globular forms, seemingly simple, in reality quite complex: in short, as visual exercises in which he practiced his tonal scales, carefully gauging the effect produced by juxtapositions of greens, yellows, and reds. Alternatively, they can be regarded as self-sufficient little pictures that, like Manet's Asparagus, deliberately reject the contrivances visible in the larger works to showcase motifs so simple as to border on abstraction."

Deux poires was featured in Cézanne's inaugural one-man show, held at Ambroise Vollard's gallery in 1895; it is one of only fourteen stilllifes that have been conclusively identified from this watershed exhibition, which catapulted Cézanne out of relative obscurity. At the Vollard show, Deux poires caught the eye of Nicolas-Auguste Hazard, a connoisseur of Daumier's work, who had never before owned a Cézanne; he purchased the canvas in February 1896 and retained it until his death. Deux poires later belonged to Baron Kojiro Matsukata, a Japanese businessman who lived in Paris during the 1920s and devoted his personal fortune to amassing a major collection of French painting and sculpture, a portion of which today forms the nucleus of the National Museum of Western Art in Tokyo.

8
Still Life with Fruit and Chestnuts
Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), Dutch
Oil on canvas, 14" x 11" (w x h), circa 1886
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, California

Vincent Van Gogh Museum and The Art Newspaper edited:
In 1960 Bruno and Sadie Adriani donated the painting to the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. However, at that point it was assumed to have been done by Van Gogh in Nuenen in 1884 and the coloring appeared unusual for that period. This raised concerns and the painting was apparently not displayed.

Its authenticity in doubt in 2019 it was confirmed, based on information concerning style, technique and also provenance by the Vincent Van Gogh Museum. It is mentioned in the inventory list of Theo van Gogh's collection of 1890. Traditionally, it was assumed that this work was painted during Van Gogh's stay in Nuenen, and hence the doubts. One of the arguments for re-attribution the work to Vincent van Gogh was the fact that Still Life with Fruit and Chestnuts most closely resembles the Paris Autumn still life Prawns and mussels (September-November. 1886) from Van Gogh in terms of style, color scheme and subject matter.

Also, the small size of Prawns and mussels is very similar compared to the Still life with fruit and chestnuts, and the same brown background, but now with brightly colored seafood on top. One may consider them pendants, both paintings displaying a quick and steady hand, working wet in wet with the same buttery consistency of the paint and a similar size of brushstrokes.


Saturday, January 9, 2021

A Pear Discussion Overshadowed

A Pear Discussion Overshadowed

as a still life with three D'Anjou pears
on snow in late afternoon behind my home in
Shapleigh, Maine, on January 8, 2021,
painted January 8, 2021
10" x 8" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $300

Thursday, January 7, 2021

Amaryllis Sky High

Amaryllis Sky High

on my deck on a sunny day in
Shapleigh, Maine on December 26, 2020
painted the morning of January 6, 2021
7" x 5" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $150

Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Now and Then... Ogunquit Stamp

Now and Then...

the same view on the Maine Bicentennial Stamp, the scene
painted in 1914 Edward Hopper, the view from Narrow Cove
looking east at the Ogunquit Museum of American Art
in Ogunquit, Maine on May 1, 2014,
painted January 3, 2021
10" x 8" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $300

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Postage Stamp Art of Maine

Sea at Ogunquit
the Maine State Bicentennial Stamp

1
Sea at Ogunquit
Edward Hopper (1882-1967), American
Oil on canvas, 29" x 24" (w x h), 1914
Whitney Museum of Art, New York

Sea at Ogunquit was exhibited in 1917 at the First Annual Exhibition at the American Society of Independent Artists in New York City as Hopper was trying to transition his career from illustrator to painter.

It features a view from Narrow Cove, Ogunquit, Maine, where artists used to congregate. Today it's the view from the Ogunquit Museum of American Art, looking east to the Atlantic Ocean. The green knoll is barely seen, the point now covered in expensive houses.

2
Forever Stamp

Maine became the 23rd state on March 15, 1820. Marking the 200th anniversary of Maine's statehood, a sheet of new stamps from the U.S. Postal Service features the iconic rocky shoreline painted by Edward Hopper (1882-1967). It was painted during one of his many summers in the state. In the coastal village of Ogunquit, an art colony since 1898, Hopper met art student Jo Nivison, whom he later married in 1924.

The Maine Statehood stamp debuted in March 2020, a sheet of twenty FOREVER stamps for $11.00.

3
The Dories, Ogunquit
Edward Hopper (1882-1967), American
Oil on canvas, 29" x 24" (w x h), 1914
Whitney Museum of Art, New York

Charles Woodbury established a summer painting school in 1898 in Ogunquit, Maine. It garnered national interest and inspired the formation of an art colony that drew the likes of Edward Hopper, George Bellows, and Robert Henri, who'd been Hopper's art teacher in New York City at the New York School of Art and Design, the forerunner of Parsons The New School for Design. Only with Woodbury's death in 1940 did his Art of Seeing school close its doors, and even so the art association his former students established has remained active to this day.

4
Perkins Cove with Unknown Artist

Possibly Henry Strater, circa 1930s
Source: Ogunquit Museum of American Art HERE

This is the view looking out from now Perkins Cove to the Atlantic. In the far right, unseen, is Narrow Cove where Hopper painted in 1916.

Before Perkins Cove was a harbor, it was simply an outflow of the Josias River. When Hopper painted his views outside what is now Perkins Cove, the fishing dories anchored outside of the Josias river outflow opposite Narrow Cove. Today the landscape of the Josias river outflow has been entirely altered by projects to build the harbor of Perkins Cove and it's high drawbridge.

5
Dories in a Cove
Edward Hopper (1882-1967), American
Oil on canvas board, 13" x 10" (w x h), 1914
Whitney Museum of Art, New York

In 1913, at the Armory Show, Hopper earned $250 when he sold his first painting, Sailing (1911), which he had painted over an earlier self-portrait. Hopper was thirty-one, and although he hoped his first sale would lead to others in short order, his career wouldn't catch on for many more years.

6
Cove at Ogunquit
Edward Hopper (1882-1967), American
Oil on canvas, 28" x 25" (w x h), 1914
Whitney Museum of Art, New York

In the summer of 1914 he painted in Ogunquit, Maine. The previous year, shortly after his father's death, Hopper had moved to the 3 Washington Square North apartment in the Greenwich Village section of Manhattan, where he would live for the rest of his life. From there he'd travel in the summers for the rest of his life, often to New England, Maine, Massachusetts, and Vermont.

7
Square Rock, Ogunquit
Edward Hopper (1882-1967), American
Oil on canvas, 29" x 24" (w x h), 1914
Whitney Museum of Art, New York

Josephine Nivison had met her future husband Edward Hopper in art school, and then again in 1914 in Ogunquit, where they were staying in the same boarding house. However, their friendship apparently only began some years later.

At an impasse over his oil paintings, in 1915 Hopper turned to etching. For the next few years, when he could, Hopper did some outdoor watercolors on visits to New England, especially at the art colonies at Ogunquit, and on Monhegan Island. But it wouldn't be until 1923 while painting with Robert Henri when he'd re-encounter his future wife, Josephine Nivison, in the summer at Gloucester, Massachusetts that, with her help, his career took off. They married in 1924.

8
The Art Student
Robert Henri (1865-1929), American
Oil on canvas, 39" x 77" (w x h), 1906
Milwaukee Museum of Art, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Portrait of Miss Josephine Nivision, later known as Jo Hopper, holding her paint brushes.

In late 1905 at the New York School of Art student Josephine Nivision met teacher Robert Henri, who asked her to pose for a portrait. In February 1906, Nivison began her career as public schoolteacher. During the next decade she earned her living by teaching, but never abandoned art and remained in touch with Henri and many other artists.

Museum notes:
At the beginning of the twentieth century, Robert Henri was among the most respected artists and instructors advancing modernism in the country, known for breaking ground with his gritty, urban landscapes and informal portraits. This portrait of art student Josephine Nivison aptly demonstrates Henri's rejection of conservative, academic standards through his emphasis on naturalism and spontaneity, as well as the sitter's informal dress and pose. Jo went on to have continued fame as a model if not artist: she posed for and is the subject of many of the paintings by her famous husband, the painter Edward Hopper.

Friday, January 1, 2021

Lemon Sunning on a Beech - Pantone 2021

Lemon Sunning on a Beech

painted in yellow and gray, Pantone's colors of the year 2021,
a yellow lemon on the gray trunk of an American beech tree
in my woods by my home on December 27, 2020,
painted January 1, 2021
10" x 8" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $300

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Museum Art of the Pantone
2021 Colors of the Year

Pantone 17-5104 Ultimate Gray
and Pantone 13-0647 Illuminating (Yellow)
Seen HERE

"A marriage of color conveying a message of strength and hopefulness that is both enduring and uplifting." The Pantone Color Institute
"Yellow and Gray? They play well together." Bruce McMillan

1
Pyramid (Maquette)
Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997), American
Collage paper and tape on foam-core,
30" x 15" x 8", circa 1996
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
Wiki:
During the 1960s, along with Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and James Rosenquist among others, Roy Lichtenstein became a leading figure in the new art movement, Pop art. His work defined the premise of pop art through parody. Inspired by the comic strip, Lichtenstein produced precise compositions that documented while they parodied, often in a tongue-in-cheek manner. He described pop art as "not American painting but actually industrial painting."

While Whaam! and Drowning Girl are generally regarded as Lichtenstein's most famous and influential works, his most expensive piece is Masterpiece, which was sold for $165,000,000 in January 2017, seen HERE.

2
Composition with Double Line and Yellow
Piet Mondrian (1872-944), Dutch
Oil on canvas, 60" x 60" (w x h), 1932
National Galleries Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland
Museum notes:
Mondrian was the leading artist of the 'De Stijl' (the style) movement, a group of Dutch artists who produced strictly geometric, abstract art. Mondrian's early work painted from nature became increasingly abstract. For example, a series of studies of trees and their branches made from 1909 to 1913 evolved into a crisscross of lines. However, it was when he became a member of the Theosophist group that he began to paint the grid paintings with which he is associated. Theosophists saw existence in terms of harmony between male and female, positive and negative, horizontal and vertical. Mondrian's paintings embody this sense of balance.

This is one of the earliest of Mondrian's so-called tram-line paintings. Before 1932 he had used single lines but he began pairing them in order to achieve a sense of optical movement. He also began to extend the coloured areas over the edge of the canvas. In this painting, Mondrian created a perfect balance between the colour and the horizontal and vertical lines, so that no one element dominated. He painted with great precision, although he did so intuitively by trial and error, not through mathematical calculation. This painting formerly belonged to the artist Winifred Nicholson, who acquired it directly from Mondrian.

3
Yellow and Gray Interior
Terry Wise (circa 1954- ), American
Oil on panel, 25" x 29" (w x h), 2019
Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, Massachusetts
Artist statement:
"Energetic, a bit chaotic, quirky, multi-layered, traditional, community-oriented. This could be a description of my personality or my life or my paintings. With my strong maternal line and influence, the domestic setting and ideas of home are standard in my work. Chairs, plates, or repeat patterns of textiles often enter into my experiments with color and composition. I'm a fan of the mid-20th century realist painters who employed varying viewpoints in a single painting.

Yellow and Gray Interior is simpler than many of my table views, focused more on composition through blocks of color, with just a hint of an interior space and an implied narrative of who might have gotten up from the chair. Sometimes I insert my maiden name, Bryant, Terry Bryant Wise, but for painting I use Terry Wise; it's simpler. I live in Stockbridge, Massachusetts."

BFA, Indiana University. The artist's website is HERE.

4
Yellow Roses in a Vase
Gustave Caillebotte (1848-1894), French
Oil on canvas, 18" x 21" (w x h), 1882
Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, Texas
Dallas Museum notes:
A bouquet of yellow roses is set on a marble table against a dark ground. The flowers are shown full-blown, just at the moment when their lush, open petals have begun to drop. The intense drama of the painting results from the contrast between the minimalist elegance of the composition and the thickly painted roses at its center. Yellow Roses in a Vase was painted during Gustave Caillebotte's first serious engagement with the genre of still life. Between 1881 and 1883, he painted more than thirty still lifes, reflecting a renewed interest in the genre among several artists of the impressionist circle, most notably Claude Monet, who shared Caillebotte's Paris studio in 1882. Yellow Roses in a Vase remained with Caillebotte throughout his life and was purchased after his death in 1894 by Edgar Degas, who collected the works of his fellow artists with great acumen, as had Caillebotte himself.

5
White Light
Jackson Pollock
Oil, enamel, and aluminum paint on canvas,
38" x 48" (w x h), 1954
MoMA, Museum of Modern Art, New York
Museum notes:
White Light is one of Pollock's last paintings and the only one he completed in 1954. He made it in part by squeezing paint directly from a tube onto the canvas evident in the sculptural white and black tendrils of paint that constitute the top layers. He also used a brush, creating subtle marbling effects by manipulating wet paint in certain areas.

6
White Sun
Beatrice Mandelman (1912-1998), American
Oil on canvas, 30" x 40" (w x h), circa 1960
Harwood Museum of Art, Taos, New Mexico
Museum notes:
Born on December 31, 1912 in Newark, New Jersey, from an early age Beatrice Mandelman was determined to be an artist. At age 12, she began taking classes at the Newark School of Fine and Industrial Art. In the 1930s, she attended Rutgers University, the Newark School of Fine and Industrial Art and the Art Students League in New York City. In 1944 Beatrice Mandelman and Louis Ribak left New York City and settled in Taos, NM, forming the nucleus of painters who would come to be known as the Taos Moderns. Big-city contemporaries of Willem de Kooning, Arshile Gorky and Jackson Pollock, their relocation to the Southwest propelled them in a new direction of modern art.

7
Yellow and Gray
Felrath Hines (1913-1993), American
Oil on linen, 48" x 54" (w x h), 1976
Smithsonian American Art Museum
Wiki notes:
Samuel Felrath Hines Jr. was an African American visual artist and art conservator. Hines served as a conservator at several institutions, including the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. and his paintings can be found in the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The artist's website is HERE.

8
Homage to the Square
Josef Albers (1888-1976), German-American
Screen print in wove paper, 9" x 9", (w x h),
Edition of 1,500, 1977
$499, Available HERE
Artspace website:
An influential artist of the 20th century, Josef Albers was a painter, print-maker, photographer, and designer known for his crucial role in developing the Bauhaus, his innovations in Geometric Abstraction, and his explorations into the subjective experience of color. As Albers noted, "When you really understand that each color is changed by a changed environment, you eventually find that you have learned about life as well as about color."

Born in Germany, Albers was a student at the Bauhaus, an institution renowned for its impact on all aspects of modern design, and began working in stained and sandblasted glass, designing windows, furniture, household objects, and typography, as well as publishing poetry and art writing. In 1933 he moved to the United States with his wife, the artist Anni Albers, where he was professor at the noted avant-garde institution Black Mountain College. He has influenced many significant artists including Peter Halley, Donald Judd, and Robert Rauschenberg.

In 1950, Albers began what would be his most famous work, the Homage to the Square series, a body of more than a thousand paintings, drawings, prints, and tapestries, created over a period of twenty-five years. The series was based on a mathematically determined format of several squares, which appear overlapping or within one another.

In 1971, Albers was the first living artist ever to be honored with a solo retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Wednesday, December 30, 2020

Lime and Pear Wearing Green Genes

Lime and Pear
Wearing Green Genes

a snow life in my yard with
a Lime and Green D'Anjou Pear
on December 18, painted December 22, 2020
5" x 7" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $150

Tuesday, December 29, 2020

Citrus Family Winter Gathering

Citrus Family Winter Gathering

a snow life in my yard
with a lime, orange, and lemon
on December 18, painted December 22, 2020
10" x 8" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $300

Sunday, December 27, 2020

Pear Here

Pear Here

a snow life in my yard with a Comice Pear
on December 18, painted December 22, 2020
10" x 8" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $300

House Harbor Stonington Study 2

House Harbor
Stonington Study 2

in Stonington, Maine, Deer Isle, on July 31, 2020,
painted August 21, 2020
4" x 6" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $100 NFS

Saturday, December 26, 2020

Pear There

Pear There

a snow life in my yard with a Comice Pear
on December 18, painted December 22, 2020
10" x 8" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $300

Friday, December 25, 2020

Leaning in to a Holiday

Leaning in to a Holiday

with a 50 foot spruce I planted as
seedling 44 years ago in my yard, as seen on
December 6, 2020, painted December 22, 2020
10" x 8" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam, and
Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness and
permanence, on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press
rough 100% cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $300

Thursday, December 24, 2020

Spruced Up Conversation

Spruced Up Conversation

with two 50 foot spruces I planted as seedlings
44 years ago in my yard, as seen on
December 6, 2020, painted December 22, 2020
10" x 8" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam, and
Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness and
permanence, on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press
rough 100% cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $300

Wednesday, December 23, 2020

Opal and Granny Posing on Snow

Opal and Granny Posing on Snow

a snow life in my yard with a yellow Opal apple
and a green Granny Smith apple on December 18,
painted December 22, 2020
10" x 8" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink
on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press rough 100%
cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $300

Tuesday, December 22, 2020

Nor'easter Wave

Nor'easter Wave

Along Ocean Drive in Kennebunkport, Maine,
in March, 2018, painted March, 2020
5" x 7" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for
light fastness and permanence, and white
Gouache on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico
cold press rough 100% cotton
extra white watercolor paper
framed, NFS

Monday, December 21, 2020

Beech Leaf Hanging On

Beech Leaf Hanging On

into winter after a fresh snowfall
on December 7, 2020, painted December 18, 2020
5" x 7" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam,
and Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness
and permanence, on 140 lb. Fabriano Artistico cold press
rough 100% cotton extra white watercolor paper
framed, $150

Down on Green, Up on Red

 (original posting March 13, 2018)

Down on Green, Up on Red
Comice pears on a snow bank behind my home
at Shapleigh, Maine on Feb 18, painted on March 13, 2018
7" x 5" (w x h), Daniel Smith, Schmincke Horadam, and
Winsor & Newton watercolors, selected for light fastness and
permanence, and Uniball waterproof fade proof ink on 140 lb. Fabriano
Artistico cold press fine grain 100% cotton extra white watercolor paper
$150 NFS GIFT

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
The Art of Comice Pears
How other artists painted them...

 
1
The Pear
Jacqueline Gnott, TWSA, WHS, South Bend, Indiana
Watercolor on paper, 5.25" x 8", 2016
Sold
Artist's web site HERE
 
2
Comice
Mary Daisy Arnold
Watercolor on paper
11/1/1935, from the
New York Experimental Station, Geneva, NY
Source web site HERE
 
3
Comice Pear
Jane Palmer, Ruthin, Denbighshire, UK
Oil, 6" x 6"
Sold
Artist's web site HERE
 
4
Ripe Pear
Claire Henning
Oil on gesso board, 6" x 6", 2013
Sold
Artist's web site HERE
 
5
Three Pears
Saundra Lane, Colorado, US
Acrylic on canvas, 20" x 16"
$100.00 USD
Artist's web site HERE
 
6
Pear
Marcus Bolt, UK
Acrylic
Artist's web site HERE
 
7
Doyenne du Comice
Miss May Rivers
Published in The Fruit Grower's Guide
by John Wright, 1891-1894. They show
Miss Rivers' artistry and skill, with an
intensity of color and attention to
detail that is remarkable.
Source HERE
 
8
Perched Pears
Tracy Vartenigian Burhans, Winchester, MA, US
Oil on glass
Sold
Artist's web site HERE